Trinity Doberman Pinschers
Bred For Longevity
Faithful, Loving, Guardians for Todays Family

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How My Pups Are Raised


Puppy Play Area inside - 8' by 10'


Crate in the Puppy Play area


Crate Condos - Crates located at the end of the Puppy Play Area

Click the link below to see the puppy yard where on nice weather days the pups play and get sunshine and exercise. This yard is kept soley for the pups.  I try and make it a environment rich experience with lots of opportunities to walk on differnt surfaces, learn to climb, play in the pool and be exposed to lots of visual stimulus
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9tA8_0ctOw


How Pups are raised at Trinity Doberman Pinshers

How I raise my pups has evolved over the years.  I have developed my “method” by studying the research and results of animal behaviorists, researchers and experts such as Scott & Fuller, Fox, Pfaffenberger, Freeman, Appleby and others. The time & attention I give my pups from minute one, provides the best opportunity for the pups to have an early learning and behavior enhancement experience.  The exercises I do, one-on-one with each pup has evolved into specific exercises.  These short exercises are based on the concepts I mined from the research of the experts as well as my years of observing litter behavior.  I have years of practical experience teaching, raising and working with my puppies – this is one of the major benefits of finding a breeder with years of experience.  I believe that pups that are exposed to the handling I provide, from the first day, will enjoy a more stable temperament, adapt easier to changes within their litter, environment and be physically advanced with respect to motor skills and coordination.  Exposure to a variety of activities and exercises are necessary to enable the best learning experience.  

 
Working with puppies from birth helps establish a natural, instinctual bond with people.  The exercises also help to identify the “levels or ranking of the litter” from the very INDEPENDANT to the most compliant FOLLOWER personalities.  This handling from birth teaches the pups early on that being compliant or giving the desired response to its handler is a behavior that is rewarded.  This natural relationship between you (pack leader) and your puppy (pack follower) builds their confidence, encourages their enthusiasm for work/training, instills a desire to please you and a willingness to work with/for you. I really believe that all this early handling helps puppies to develop their fullest potential, as long as the pups owners continue to invest the time and energy needed to raise/train their puppy to be well mannered and obedient.

 
The reason I keep the pups until they are 10-12 weeks old, is that it is vital to the puppies natural pack development, and pack social evolution.  This time spent with their littermates and mother is the natural way for them to begin learning proper canine social behavior.  It is very important that the puppies get the right balance of stimulation, play and rest so they enjoy learning.  I ensure that a significant amount of time is devoted to socialization with people and adult dogs. 

 
I think SOCIALIZATION is a very over used word and often times does not accurately describe what you are doing with the young puppy.  Because the pups are whelped and raised in my home they also become ACCLIMATED to and familiar with the TV, Microwave, vaccum etc.  By ensuring pups are exposed/acclimated to these normal household activities, I believe these experiences ensure I am raising a puppy who is confident, socially adept and prepared to go to his new family because he has grown up in a sensory enriched environment.  I also play the CD “Puppy Sounds” by Dean Lake as often as I can – so they can become acclimated to the sounds they will encounter out in the real world.

 
The best “drive” to use when working with pups at this early age is the food drive.  I handle and touch and hold the pups from day one.  I start teaching the pups to sit @ 3 weeks. I use little raw hamburger balls.  Those pups that I have been given a call name for I use when giving the “sit’ command.  These pups know their names and come when called pretty reliably by the time they go home.  As I raise the pups there are lots of teachable training moments to use this command – I love it when I can get a whole litter to sit on command before their dinner bowls get put down!  They have to sit before their food bowl goes down.  The puppies will have learned that if they want to be petted, picked up, or taken out of the puppy pen, they must sit first (learning self control and to pay attention to what momma is saying).  I also start teaching the pups “leave it” from a very young age, and “settle” which means calm down

Raising pups the right ways starts in the beginning:

 
During Gestation:

 

Stressful situations encountered by the dam during gestation can affect her puppies, so I take great care in ensuring my girls have a calm, non-stressful environment for the duration of their pregnancy.  I also ensure my girls receive exercise, excellent nutrition and lots of loving attention.  Especially the last 30 days my girls get body massages and lots of gentle brushing each day.  Studies have shown that when a pregnant animal is petted, the litter is more docile.  The petting activates the parasympathetic system, facilitating relaxation, emotional attachment and socialization.  Puppies from a petted mother have a greater tolerance to handling than puppies from a mother that is not petted.  By doing these things I feel I am doing the best I can do to give the pups great start in life.

 Neurological Stimulation:

 
I utilize neurologic stimulation based on Dr. Fox's research as well as the U.S. Military's "Bio-Sensor" program.  Incorporating exercises from both sources, my puppies are gently handled using this series of exercises to produce brain wave activity that would not naturally occur otherwise.  Early brain development is enhanced by creating more neuro synapses.   Research has shown that this early stimulation has significant and lasting effects which include improved
future performance as well as the ability to withstand stress better than pups that are not-stimulated. 

 Grooming Conditioning / Desenitiziation:

 
I touch puppies all over from the time they're born in an effort to desensitize or familiarize pups to someone touching them.  Because many puppies/dogs have an aversion to grooming, I make it a very positive bonding experience.  By the time my puppies leave between 10-12 weeks, they are comfortable with bathing (with damp cloths), brushing, ear cleaning, nail dremeling, and being held and touched everywhere.

 Crate Training

 

I begin Crate training my puppies at approximately 4-5 weeks of age, at this age they have developed the instinctual desire to eliminate away from where they sleep.  I acclimate puppies to crate training at an early age because it's a great help in house training.  It also gives the puppy a safe place of its own so it gets accustomed to being confined for short periods of time and associates it with positive events. When the pups go home they will be sleeping from 11 pm to 6 am without mistakes in their crates.  Crating helps them develop control over elimination because they do not want to eliminate where they sleep.  This is the first step to house breaking.  The pups will be paper trained when they come to you but they quickly transfer to eliminating outside.

Puppy Development at Trinity Dobermans

As the pups get older I continue to acclimate the pups to other auditory and visual stimulus – so they acclimate or learn that a strange loud noise is nothing to panic over.  Each new noisy toy, noisy plastic bag, THE MIRROR lol, lets the puppy investigate on their own to discover there is nothing to fear by these NEW things that find their way into their environment.

 

By 5 to 6 weeks old, weather permitting the puppies are able to go outside in the Puppy Play Yard – ONLY puppies are allowed in this area.  I teach the puppies the rule of sevens – acclimating them to 7 different surfaces:  Blankets, Carpet, Tile, linoleum, wood, plastic crates and stools, cardboard, metal trashcan lid, and of course dirt and grass and the obligatory red clay mud found in VA lol.



 In the Puppy Play Yard there are 2 FisherPrice play forts with slides – logs – plastic crates 3’x3’x6” for them to step up on, sleep on and I have 2 plastic step stools to climb on as well.  I have a rope with plastic bottles strung on it and another rope/bungee with an octopus kong toy to pull on and watch spring in the air when they let go.  This year I added an agility practice tunnel - and what a hit that was!!! Summer puppies also get a small kiddie pool filled with water, plastic water bottles and balls of all sizes. 

 
I try and add new things for them to explore and investigate – this activity builds confidence and coordination.  Their minds re stimulated by the challenge presented and the opportunity to try new things and solve problems.  I have added an agility practice tunnel - and what a hit that was!!!   

 

Inside the Puppy Play Pen has lots of stuffies with noisy squeekers, and balls, kongs, beef bones, balls, ropes, plastic soda bottles cardboard box and braided fleecy ropes attached to the sides of the expens.  This year I bought some interactive noisy balls which was great to see how each of the pups reacted – Tires that when touched and rolled make all kinds of farm animal sounds, and Giggle Balls – these little balls that bounced and made noise and tumbled all over – these were a great addition to the puppy toy box.

 

 How I raise my pups has evolved over the years.  I have developed my “method” by studying the research and results of animal behaviorists, researchers and experts such as Scott & Fuller, Fox, Pfaffenberger, Freeman, Appleby and others. The time & attention I give my pups from minute one, provides the best opportunity for the pups to have an early learning and behavior enhancement experience.  The exercises I do, one-on-one with each pup has evolved into specific exercises.  These short exercises are based on the concepts I mined from the research of the experts as well as my years of observing litter behavior.  I have years of practical experience teaching, raising and working with my puppies – this is one of the major benefits of finding a breeder with years of experience.  I believe that pups that are exposed to the handling I provide, from the first day, will enjoy a more stable temperament, adapt easier to changes within their litter, environment and be physically advanced with respect to motor skills and coordination.  Exposure to a variety of activities and exercises are necessary to enable the best learning experience. 
 

 Working with puppies from birth helps establish a natural, instinctual bond with people.  The exercises also help to identify the “levels or ranking of the litter” from the very INDEPENDANT to the most compliant FOLLOWER personalities.  This handling from birth teaches the pups early on that being compliant or giving the desired response to its handler is a behavior that is rewarded.  This natural relationship between you (pack leader) and your puppy (pack follower) builds their confidence, encourages their enthusiasm for work/training, instills a desire to please you and a willingness to work with/for you. I really believe that all this early handling helps puppies to develop their fullest potential, as long as the pups owners continue to invest the time and energy needed to raise/train their puppy to be well mannered and obedient.

 The reason I keep the pups until they are 10-12 weeks old, is that it is vital to the puppies natural pack development, and pack social evolution.  This time spent with their littermates and mother is the natural way for them to begin learning proper canine social behavior.  It is very important that the puppies get the right balance of stimulation, play and rest so they enjoy learning.  I ensure that a significant amount of time is devoted to socialization with people and adult dogs. 

  

 

 

 

 

 

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